Track Descriptions

Track Description:

The advances in machine learning techniques have led to the rapid emergence of artificial intelligence (AI) and business analytics (BA) applications in various domains. AI and BA applications involve leveraging algorithms, methods, systems, and applications to interpret and learn from large, heterogeneous data to achieve specific goals, such as improving business and management operations. It is important for IS researchers to study the development, implementation, and management of AI and BA applications and understand how AI and BA create value for organizations and societies. The new and exciting research topics would lead to a significant extension of our current theories, methodologies, and empirical insights related to the phenomenon. We welcome submissions from a breadth of research paradigms, including behavioral, economics, design science, and data science.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Novel AI, BA, machine learning, and deep learning methods
  • Natural language processing
  • Speech recognition
  • Computer vision
  • AI in robotics
  • Human-robot interaction
  • Design and implementation of AI and BA applications, such as metaverse, blockchain, fintech, e-commerce, healthcare, and cybersecurity
  • Development of AI and BA architectures, infrastructures, and capabilities
  • Ethics and privacy concerns in AI and BA
  • Machine learning fairness and algorithmic bias
  • Explainable AI
  • Social, behavioral, and economic implications of AI and BA
  • Organizational structure and management in the age of AI and BA
  • Success factors, best practices, and case studies in AI and BA

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Hailiang Chen (The University of Hong Kong)
  • Yue (Katherine) Feng (Hong Kong Polytechnic University)
  • Hyeokkoo Eric Kwon (Nanyang Technological University)

Associate Editors:

  • Liwei Chen (University of Cincinnati)
  • Yipu Deng (The University of Hong Kong)
  • Carlos Fernández-Loría (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology)
  • Nakyung Kyung (National University of Singapore)
  • Guangrui (Kayla) Li (York University)
  • Hongfei Li (Chinese University of Hong Kong)
  • Andrew Lee (the University of Texas at Dallas)
  • Junyeong Lee (Chungbuk National University)
  • Tian Lu (Arizona State University)
  • Ka Chung (Boris) Ng (Hong Kong Polytechnic University)
  • Vandith Pamuru (Indian School of Business)
  • Siliang Jack Tong (Nanyang Technological University)
  • Wen Wang (University of Maryland)
  • Nila Zhang (Fudan University)

Track Description:

Blockchain, distributed ledger technology (DLT), and Fintech have the potential to make value flow freely through the tokenization of tangible and intangible assets, driving the digital transformation of our society. It is highly expected that Blockchain, DLT, and Fintech will bring a vast array of opportunities to the development of the next generation of the internet, the so-called Web 3, and trigger a new round of technological innovation and industrial transformation. Although the full impact of Blockchain, DLT, and Fintech is yet to be unleashed, we have witnessed the exponential growth in the number and prominence of Web3 applications, including Decentralized Finance (DeFi), Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs), decentralized autonomous organization (DAOs), and Metaverse, providing great opportunities for IS research. This track aims to highlight novel research about Blockchain, DLT, and Fintech, and discuss their current and future directions. We invite both theoretical and empirical studies that apply any perspective (behavioral, computational, design science, economics, organizational).

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Theories of next-generation blockchain, DLT, and fintech
  • Security, privacy, and trust of blockchain, DLT, and fintech
  • Protocols and algorithms for blockchain, DLT, and fintech
  • Decentralized Finance
  • Non-Fungible Tokens
  • Decentralized Autonomous Organizations
  • Consensus mechanism
  • Smart contracts and their applications
  • Metaverse analysis and design paradigms in various business sectors
  • Blockchain, DLT, or Fintech-empowered Web 3 applications
  • Blockchain-enabled Incentive Mechanisms in Metaverse
  • User behaviors in Metaverse
  • Transaction mechanisms in Web 3 platforms
  • Experimental Web 3 prototyping and testbeds
  • Security of Blockchain
  • Economic and monetary aspects of cryptocurrencies

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Jiang Wu (Wuhan University)
  • Jiaqi Yan (Nanjing University)
  • Jianming Zhu (Central University of Finance and Economics)

Associate Editors:

  • Kem Zhang (Lakehead University)
  • Huaming Chen (The University of Sydney)
  • Xiang (Shawn) Wang (Santa Clara University)
  • Sophia Zhang (Baylor University)
  • Xiaofan Liu (City University of Hong Kong)
  • Ning Zhang (Central University of Finance and Economics)
  • Xuewen Dong (Xidian University)
  • Yunhua He (North China University of Technology)
  • Yonggui Fu (Shanxi University of Finance and Economics)
  • Aning Hu (South University of Science and Technology of China)
  • Can Sun (University of Science and Technology of China)
  • Xiabing Zheng (University of Science and Technology of China)
  • Qianzhou Du (Nanjing University)
  • Gengxin Sun (Qingdao University)
  • Kun Chen (South University of Science and Technology of China)
  • Shengjie Yang (Hunan University of Technology and Business)
  • Xiong Zhang (Beijing Jiao Tong University)
  • Liying Ye (South University of Science and Technology of China)
  • Hou Zhu (Sun Yat-sen University)
  • Dan Ke (Wuhan University)
  • Guoyin Jiang (University of Electronic Science and Technology of China)
  • Renee Rui Chen (Shenzhen University)

Track Description:

With the help of information technologies (IT), people can now be connected via digital platforms to interact, share knowledge and expertise, and transact on a variety of assets and services (e.g. accommodation, vehicle). This has given rise to a multitude of sharing economy platforms with different focuses, such as housing, hospitality, fintech, education, transportation, dating, and e-commerce. Such platforms include Airbnb, Didi, Uber, Blablacar, Lime, Couchsurfing, and Silvernest, among others.
Digital platforms also enable crowd-based models of content production, innovation, and funding, where disparate resources of individuals and organizations can be aggregated to address complex corporate as well as societal problems and challenges. For example, Wikipedia taps into the “wisdom of the crowd” to create the world’s most complete encyclopedia that is constantly being updated. Kickstarter allows small amounts of capital from a large number of individuals to be pooled together to finance new business ventures and creative projects. Together with sharing economy platforms, they have made significant social, economic, and legal impacts, which may be positive or negative.
More recently, mobile and related technologies have enabled more ubiquitous usage of such digital platforms. Mobile users may now share information and resources with one another based on their location in real-time, and they can do so anywhere and anytime, as long as they have access to their mobile devices. For example, users may invite strangers nearby to engage in group buying at an offline retail store. These innovative forms of peer-to-peer sharing have created both opportunities for organizations as well as new challenges that need to be addressed. This track thus invites cutting-edge research work that investigates various topics around sharing economy, platforms, and crowds.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Critical factors influencing the success and sustainability of sharing economy and crowd-based models
  • Novel theories and perspectives about sharing economy, platforms, and crowd-based models
  • Organizational use of platforms and crowds – both within and outside the enterprise
  • Innovative business models that leverage the sharing economy and crowd-based principles
  • How sharing economy and crowd-based models help address corporate and societal problems
  • New methods and paradigms for the study of platforms, sharing economy, and crowds
  • Critical review and ethical perspectives related to sharing economy, crowd-based models, and platforms
  • Trust issues in the sharing economy and crowd-based models
  • Opportunities and challenges in applying new technology to the platform-enabled sharing economy and crowd-based models and the study of these topics
  • Social, legal, technological, geo-political, and economic implications of platforms, sharing, and crowds
  • Design and governance of digital platforms to promote the health of the sharing economy and protect participants’ interests
  • Case studies on sharing economy and crowd-based business models

Track Co-chairs:

  • Wai Fong BOH (Nanyang Technological University)
  • Chee Wei PHANG (Nottingham University Ningbo China)
  • Cheng ZHANG (Fudan University)

Associate Editors:

  • Allen AU (National Chung Cheng University)
  • Yang BAO (Shanghai Jiao Tong University)
  • Zixiu Guo (University of New South Wales)
  • Yumei HE (Tulane University)
  • Yuxin HUANG (Soochow University)
  • Yuanchun JIANG (Hefei University of Technology)
  • Wenwen LI (Fudan University)
  • Haoyuan LIU (Nanyang Technological University)
  • Jing TIAN (The Pennsylvania State University)
  • Le WANG (City University of Hong Kong)
  • Qiang WEI (Tsinghua University)
  • Jin XU (Southwest Jiaotong University)
  • Lusi Yang (Georgia State University)
  • Yingjie ZHANG (Peking University)
  • Yicheng ZHANG (Huazhong University of Science and Technology)
  • Xi ZHAO (Xi’an Jiaotong University)
  • Bowen ZHENG (Central South University)
  • Ya ZHOU (Xiamen University)

Track Description:

Recent technological advancements such as analytics, artificial intelligence (AI), the internet of things (IoT), social media, and big data are rapidly transforming our daily lives, businesses, and society at large. However, as our dependency on technologies is ever-increasing, we are also witnessing many unintended negative consequences related to the use of technologies, which sometimes exceed the positive utility gained from them. Increasing global and environmental issues have surfaced the need for digital resilience in security, privacy, and ethics. For instance, the COVID-19 pandemic has led to an unprecedented level of surveillance, monitoring, and identification of individuals. The pandemic has also exposed the fragility arising from overlooked risks embedded in the design of organizations, supply chains, decision-making processes, and underlying information systems.
From a cybersecurity perspective, the proliferation of social media and mobile technologies intensifies the concerns of data breaches. Criminals are finding new ways online to conduct illegal activities like online fraud, identity theft, and cyber-terrorism. As a result, firms are actively seeking solutions to address these cybersecurity and privacy issues, and governments are implementing security and privacy policies. More recently, we see the emergence of undesirable ethical issues in the use of technologies. As exemplified by the case of Cambridge Analytica and Facebook, improper use of consumer data has serious business implications with possible legal, social, and political consequences. Online platforms are also criticized for some major failures such as the spread of fake news and the reinforcement of echo chambers, resulting in political polarization.
As a response to these challenges, this track seeks academic contributions that attempt to provide a better understanding of (1) the potential security, privacy, and ethical issues in the use of technologies; (2) the consequences of these issues on individuals, businesses, and society; (3) possible solutions to address the concerns of security, privacy, and ethical issues while realizing the values generated by the technologies. Submitted manuscripts can draw on any theoretical background and methodological approaches.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Data security and breaches
  • User privacy and confidentiality
  • Ethical use of data and analytics
  • Internet-enabled crimes
  • Ethically undesirable online practices
  • Information security policy and compliance
  • Business, legal, social, and political consequences of IS security and privacy
  • The dark web, live-streaming of crimes, harmful online content, etc.
  • Surveillance and its impact on security, privacy, and ethics in organizations
  • Fake news, online discrimination
  • Possible solutions, regulations, policies
  • Tradeoffs between analytics initiatives and security/privacy concerns
  • Security and privacy issues on emerging technologies such as AI applications, blockchain technologies, IoT, etc.)
  • Security threat intelligence
  • Security/privacy concerns on crowdsourcing/crowdfunding platforms
  • Building and designing privacy/security resilient information systems
  • Understanding how digital technologies help to create/maintain privacy and security resilience
  • Information architectures and governance framework that promote privacy/security resilience

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Seung Hyun Kim (Yonsei University)
  • Ben Choi (Nanyang Technological University)
  • Juhee Kwon (City University of Hong Kong)

Associate Editors:

  • Xiuyan Shao (Southeast University)
  • Ruibin Geng (Xidian University)
  • Chulho Lee (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology)
  • Jaeung Sim (University of Connecticut)
  • Yoon (Yoonseock) Son (Notre Dame University)
  • Jie Yu (Joseph) (University of Nottingham Ningbo China)
  • Xinxue Zhou (Guangxi University)
  • Yang Liu (Xi’an Jiaotong University)
  • Yi Wu (Tianjin University)
  • Xiaopan Wang (Zhejiang Gongshang University)
  • Ping Fan Ke (Singapore Management University)
  • Yongjin Park (City University of Hong Kong)
  • Tianjian Zhang (City University of Hong Kong)
  • Chul Woo Yoo (Florida Atlantic University)

Track Description:

Design science is a diverse research area that extends the boundaries and capabilities of individuals and organizations by designing, building, and evaluating new constructs, models, algorithms, methods, and systems to solve practical problems. It includes computational design science, optimization design science, representation design science, and economics design science, among others (Rai, 2017). While the different streams of design science paradigms have their different focal topics and writing styles, they together make significant contributions to the world and change the practice.
In particular, we witnessed the emergence (advance) of several technologies in recent years, such as artificial intelligence (AI), augmented reality (AR)/metaverse, blockchain/nft/distributed computing, cloud/edge computing, Internet of Things (IoTs), and cyber-physical system (CPS), which has afforded new possibilities as well as new concerns (e.g., fairness, security, and privacy) for design science in various application domains. This calls for more grounded design science research that leads and directs the design, implementation, and evolution of contemporary IT artifacts, which would solve problems and improve the environment in which they are instantiated.
We thereby welcome a diversity of submissions that can produce novel theoretical knowledge, practical insights, and methodological basis on novel design science topics. The track seeks to synthesize broader understandings in the diversity of all types of design science studies, as specified by Rai (2017).
Reference:
Arun Rai. 2017. “Editor’s Comments: Diversity of Design Science Research,” MIS Quarterly, (41: 1) pp.iii-xviii.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Design theories and principles for emerging digital technologies
  • Conceptual modeling, including big data modeling
  • Innovate design of information systems
  • Design of novel algorithms or models
  • Design for innovative applications, such as AI, AR, IoT, etc.
  • Modeling and optimization of IS design
  • IT-enabled mechanism design
  • Design for platforms and collaborative applications
  • Design science research to solve IT use and user experience issues
  • Impact of design on individuals, organizations, and society
  • Ethics in design science research
  • Fairness, security, and privacy issues in design science research
  • AI behavior and human-computer interaction design
  • Emerging methods for design science research

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Xin Li (City University of Hong Kong), Xin.Li@cityu.edu.hk
  • Yidong Chai (Hefei University of Technology), chaiyd@hfut.edu.cn
  • Mohammad Jabbari (Université Laval), mohammad.jabbari@fsa.ulaval.ca

Associate Editors:

  • Amin Amiri (Tilburg University), a.amiri@tilburguniversity.edu
  • Arturo Castellanos (William and Mary), arturo.castellanosbueso@mason.wm.edu
  • Hongyi Zhu (the University of Texas at San Antonio), hongyi.zhu@utsa.edu
  • Hsin-Min Lu (National Taiwan University), luim@ntu.edu.tw
  • Jianshan Sun (Hefei University of Technology), sunjs9413@hfut.edu.cn
  • Jianwei Liu (Dalian University of Technology), jianweiliu@dlut.edu.cn
  • Karl Werder (University of Cologne), werder@wiso.uni-koeln.de
  • Liuan Wang (Beijing Institute of Technology), wangliuan1973@bit.edu.cn
  • Mengke Qiao (University of Science and Technology of China), mkqiao@ustc.edu.cn
  • Nichalin Summerfield (UMASS Lowell), Nichalin_Summerfield@uml.edu
  • Nikolai Kazantsev (University of Cambridge / The University of Manchester)nikolai.kazantsev@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk
  • Rehan Syed (Queensland University of Technology), r.syed@qut.edu.au
  • Shan Jiang (University of Massachusetts Boston), Shan.Jiang@umb.edu
  • Shaokun Fan (Oregon State University), shaokun.fan@oregonstate.edu
  • Thushari Silva (University of Moratuwa), thusharip@uom.lk
  • Xiao Han (Shanghai University of Finance and Economics), xiaohan@mail.shufe.edu.cn
  • Xueyan Yin (City University of Hong Kong), xueyayin@cityu.edu.hk
  • Yang Qian (Hefei University of Technology), soberqian@hfut.edu.cn
  • Xuan Wei (Shanghai Jiao Tong University), weix@sjtu.edu.cn
  • Zhe Li (Beijing University of Civil Engineering and Architecture), lizhe@bucea.edu.cn
  • Zhiya Zuo (City University of Hong Kong), zhiyazuo@cityu.edu.hk
  • Alexander Chung (Université Laval), alexander.chung@fsa.ulaval.ca

Track Description:

Digital innovations have transformed how businesses are conducted today. New technologies related to big data, blockchain, the Internet of Things, and machine learning are some examples of innovations that have disrupted industries and created new business models. In recent years, digital entrepreneurship is increasingly regarded as a potential solution to invigorate the market, create new jobs, and unleash the growth potential of businesses and industries. However, digital innovations will only create value for businesses if they are being properly developed and managed, and entrepreneurs often face challenges in creating and capturing value from innovations for their stakeholders. Even successful tech companies such as Facebook and Google took years before they were able to find viable business models that leverage their innovative technologies. In saying that, these successful businesses continue to pursue innovations and new business models.
To fully unleash the potential of digital innovations, it is crucial to discover, understand and exploit the digitally enabled opportunities to create something new, including products or services, markets, production processes, ways of organizing, and business models. This track welcomes submissions investigating digital innovations, entrepreneurship, and emerging digital business models. We welcome all methodological approaches and perspectives, and submissions are encouraged from all theoretical perspectives drawing from IS, entrepreneurship, strategic management, organizational behavior, and related disciplines.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Entrepreneurship and New Business models enabled by digital innovations
  • Development, evaluation, and value contributions of innovations and business models in the era of artificial intelligence, blockchain, big data, and the Internet of Things.
  • Values created by new digital innovations to entrepreneurship
  • Digital entrepreneurship and innovation management
  • Platform innovation and platform economy
  • Value co-creation between digital (micro-)entrepreneurs and platform provider
  • Digital entrepreneurship through the formation of a new firm or the transformation of an existing firm
  • Digital innovations and business models in addressing societal and grand challenges
  • Strategic implications of emerging digital business models

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Carmen Leong (UNSW Sydney)
  • Alain Chong (University of Nottingham Ningbo China)
  • Jing (Elaine) Chen (Beihang University)

Associate Editors:

  • Mairead O’ Connor (UNSW Sydney)
  • Na Liu (University of Sydney)
  • Sachithra Lokuge (University of Southern Queensland)
  • Zhe Zhu (Jinan University)
  • Gongtai Wang (Queen’s University)
  • Jin Chen (University of Nottingham Ningbo China)
  • Jiaxu Peng (Central University of Finance and Economics)
  • Lu Yang (National University of Singapore)
  • Chenxi Li (Beihang University)
  • Xiaodie Pu (University of Nottingham Ningbo China)
  • Young Hoon Chang (Beijing Institute of Technology)
  • Siew Fan Wong (Taylor’s University Malaysia)
  • Gordan Zhengzhi Guan (University of Science and Technology of China)
  • Tristan Chong (SP Jain School of Global Management)
  • Yi Shen (Soochow University)

Track Description:

From Alibaba to Uber, iOS, and Facebook, digital platforms and ecosystems have brought about substantial societal change in the last decade, accelerating the growth of online shopping, ridesharing, application development, gaming, social networking, etc. Such technology-mediated shifts in aspects of both work and play have prompted significant IT investments in developing platform capabilities to facilitate the exchange of goods, services, or social currency in large and complex networks of suppliers, intermediaries, and customers. Amid intensifying business competition and rapid societal change, platforms increasingly face environmental and organizational challenges posed by their surrounding ecosystem, such that it is becoming increasingly complex to establish, manage, and sustain platform-based business models. For example, unlike traditional pipeline businesses, platforms must be sensitive to network effects between multiple sides of the market and manage interoperability and regulatory issues, including access, compatibility, and control of information assets. This rapid emergence of digital platforms and ecosystems has put practitioners and researchers on notice, presenting significant challenges and opportunities for IS research. Therefore, this track invites submissions that enrich and advance research in the arena of digital platforms and ecosystems. We invite rigorous and relevant studies employing a wide range of research methodologies, and at all levels of analysis, addressing various aspects of digital platforms, ecosystems, and their impacts on aspects of business and society. We aim to provide a forum for scholars to present new theories or empirical evidence in the area.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • New practices or lessons in managing digital platforms and ecosystems
  • Joint innovation and entrepreneurship on digital platforms and ecosystems
  • Platform leadership and development strategies
  • Governance and regulation of digital platforms and ecosystems
  • Network effects and externalities of ecosystems
  • Emerging business models, competitive strategies, and value co-creation activities on digital platforms
  • Platform participants’ behaviors and their interactions with platforms
  • Sustainable development for digital ecosystems
  • “Dark side” of digital platforms and ecosystems
  • Social networks in digital platforms
  • Human resource management of digital platforms
  • Economic and social implications of digital platforms and ecosystems
  • Design and implementation of digital platform architecture or infrastructure
  • The make-or-join decision for digital platforms and ecosystems
  • The antecedents, nature, and consequences of digital platform success

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Chunmian Ge (South China University of Technology)
  • Hefu Liu (University of Science and Technology of China)
  • Haiyang Feng (Tianjin University)

Associate Editors:

  • Aihui Chen (Tianjin University)
  • Angela Lu (City University of Hong Kong)
  • Chenglong Zhang (Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen)
  • Huifang Li (University of Science and Technology of China)
  • Jingmei Zhou (Renmin University of China)
  • Junhui Jiang (South China University of Technology)
  • Ling Xue (Georgia State University)
  • Linlin Liu (South China University of Technology)
  • Peijian Song (Nanjing University)
  • Xiao Xiao (Copenhagen Business School)
  • Xinlin Tang (Florida State University)
  • Xinxue Qu (University of Notre Dame)
  • Ying Liu (University of Massachusetts Amherst)
  • Yu Tong (Zhejiang University)
  • Zhepeng Li (The University of Hong Kong)

Track Description:

E-business or electronic business has been one of the central phenomena in IS research and research on this topic has been evolving with the advancement of technologies and associated changes in business and society. E-business together with new technologies is often delivered to customers through centralized or decentralized platforms. These platforms facilitated the value creation of e-business activities and at the same time have raised a series of questions in the design and behavioral aspects of e-business research. Digital technologies, e.g., wide application of mobile technologies and increasing integration of block-chain, metaverse, and AI technologies, together with ardent entrepreneurs and capitalists, have inspired product/service innovations, reconfiguration of business models through digital and mobile platforms, with an accelerated rate of transformation. Modern organizations, societies, and individuals, therefore, face various challenges in identifying opportunities, developing capabilities, and managing changes.
Researchers have the mission to be cautious observers and critical thinkers. It is important to carefully examine the interactions between technologies and business in a specific context, scrutinize the possible IT fads, and craft solid theories with practical relevance. This track aims to provide a forum for the exchange of rigorous research ideas in the relevant areas. We encourage the submission of manuscripts that reflect the state of the art in e-business in the updated technical/social/economic contexts, shed novel theoretical insights, provide interesting empirical evidence, and seek to challenge extant findings in IS field. This track is open to all types of research: conceptual, theoretical, analytical, and/or empirical studies, full-paper as well as work-in-progress.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Digital architecture and business analytics for e-business on digital and mobile platforms
  • E-business strategies on digital and mobile platforms
  • E-business capabilities on digital and mobile platforms
  • Business processes and management on digital and mobile platforms, e.g., mobile marketing, mobile payment, supply chain, logistics, etc.
  • Entrepreneurship and innovation in e-business on digital and mobile platforms
  • New business models on digital and mobile platforms
  • Economics of digital and mobile platforms
  • Privacy, security, and trust issues in e-business on digital and mobile platforms
  • User studies of e-business on digital and mobile platforms
  • Business, economic, and societal impacts
  • Social media and social commerce
  • Issues with cross-border e-business
  • E-business on digital and mobile platforms in emerging economies
  • Other emerging issues in e-business

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Kathy Ning Shen (UAE University)
  • Helen S. Du (Guangdong University of Technology)
  • Shang wei (Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science)

Associate Editors:

  • Heng Tang (University of Macau)
  • Hui Zhu (Guangzhou University)
  • Lili Liu (Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics)
  • Hongting Tang (Guangdong University of Technology)
  • Xiaobo Ke (The University of Hong Kong)
  • Yide Liu (Macau University of Science and Technology)
  • Jilei Zhou (Renmin University of China)
  • Xuerong Li (Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science)
  • Jiahua Jin (University of Science and Technology Beijing)
  • Xin Li (University of Science and Technology Beijing)
  • Wei Chen (University of Arizona)
  • Abbas Tarhini (Lebanese American University)
  • Huijing Guo (China University of Mining and Technology)
  • Jingyuan Su (Zhejiang Sci-Tech University)
  • Charbel Chedrawi (Saint Joseph University)

Track Description:

Information technology (IT) has fundamentally transformed businesses, reshaped consumer behaviors, and redefined markets. This ongoing transformation is fascinating and has inspired researchers to reconsider how we understand the interactions between economic actors, how we define and coordinate work, and how we support economic activities. There is a growing interest in the application of economics to various new research frontiers such as e-commerce, social media, mobile, Fintech, crowds, and the sharing economy, along with policy, regulation, and security challenges.
This track invites theoretical and empirical papers exploring the linkages between economics and information systems. The track hopes to include papers using or adapting state-of-the-art economic theories to explain the application, use, or impact of IT in businesses, organizations, and consumers, as well as papers explaining how IT is transforming the social and economic environment. We invite submissions that are theoretically rigorous and empirically grounded in real-world contexts. Pure theory and methodology papers will also be welcomed, provided that they demonstrate the novelty of the theory and methodology in real-world applications.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • AI and machine learning transformation of markets and organizations
  • Blockchain-based applications and smart contracts
  • Crowdfunding, crowdsourcing, and other collective initiatives
  • Digital goods, digital marketplaces, and online platforms
  • Emerging technologies
  • Entrepreneurship and enterprise innovation
  • IT security and consumer privacy
  • Sharing economy and gig economy

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Zhiling Guo (Singapore Management University)
  • Jianqing Chen (The University of Texas at Dallas)
  • Dandan Qiao (National University of Singapore)

Associate Editors:

  • Yanzhen Chen (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology)
  • Yang Gao (Singapore Management University)
  • Jisu Cao (University of Connecticut)
  • Byungwan Koh (Korea University)
  • Gen Li (Fudan University)
  • Jin Li (Xi’an Jiaotong University)
  • Ben Liu (City University of Hong Kong)
  • Dan Ma (Singapore Management University)
  • Xiaowei Mei (The Hong Kong Polytechnic University)
  • Hyelim Oh (Sogang University)
  • Rajib Saha (Indian School of Business)
  • Alex Wang (Peking University)
  • Hongyan Xu (Chongqing University)
  • Mi Zhou (The University of British Columbia)

Track Description:

With the diffusion of the Internet, mobile phones, and other digital technologies, organizations are implementing and experimenting with various digital products and services to improve customer experiences and operational efficiency. To maintain competitiveness in the marketplace, organizations need to mindfully and agilely orchestrate digital technologies with other organizational assets and capabilities to create – or modify existing – business strategies, processes, and culture to meet changing business and market requirements.
The complex and dynamic nature of digital transformation entails fundamental changes to the underlying processes, structures, and capabilities that organizations have to embrace, adapt, and innovate. A number of significant managerial issues pertaining to governance, strategy, and IS value have to be identified and effectively organized. For example, how do organizations appraise the business value of digital innovations? What are the implications of digital technologies on organizational innovation trajectories? How does digital transformation enable new organizational structure, business operations, and ways of building inter-organizational collaborations? IS value is increasingly grounded on emerging technologies (e.g., artificial intelligence, machine learning, and big data analytics), and yet, an assessment of these technologies’ impacts in the strategic management context is missing. What is the role of artificial intelligence in organization and business decision-making? Do different machine learning techniques require different design or managerial approaches? What is the effect of advanced technologies on empathy and reciprocity construction in organizations? New IT governance and mechanisms are also needed to augment the capabilities of digital technologies and human talent, thus improving organizational resilience.
This track invites thought-provoking, original research papers. We welcome research that either develops a new theoretical framework, offers insightful analytical viewpoints, or provides interesting empirical findings. We also require that submitted papers offer meaningful and actionable implications for practitioners.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • A digital solution for business value (co-)creation and capture
  • Digital creativity and innovations
  • Digital capability creation and management
  • Benefit realization of digitalization innovation/transformation
  • IS/IT flexibility, alignment, and ambidexterity
  • Digital platform governance
  • Governance of enterprise or inter-organizational IS/IT applications and services
  • New business models enabled by digital innovations

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Carol Hsu (University of Sydney Business School)
  • Yang Chen (Southwestern University of Finance and Economics)
  • Joyce Lee (National Chengchi University)

Associate Editors:

  • Meng Chen (Soochow University)
  • Petros Chamakiotis (ESCP Business School)
  • Tommy K. H. Chan (The University of Manchester)
  • Yen-Chun Chou (National Chengchi University)
  • Jialun Hu (Royal Holloway, University of London)
  • Zach W. Y. Lee (University of Leicester)
  • Wilson K.S. Leung (The Hong Kong Polytechnic University)
  • Liang Li (University of International Business and Economics)
  • Patty Pai (National Chengchi University)
  • Ruonan Sun (University of Lancaster)
  • Tommi Tapanainen (Pusan National University)
  • Hsien-Tung Tsai (National Taipei University)
  • Jostein Engesmo (Norwegian University of Science and Technology)
  • Yi Wang (Southwestern University of Finance and Economics)
  • Nianxin Wang (Jiangsu University of Science and Technology)
  • Lubna Alam(Deakin University)

Track Description:

This track focuses on issues related to the manner in which humans interact with technologies in organizational, managerial, cultural, and social contexts. Humans and machines are collaborating in new ways and organizations are increasingly leveraging intelligent systems. This new human-computer and human-robot interactions represent an evolution in how work is going to be done and impact individual and team dynamics. Understanding how digital technology shapes human cognition and emotion, and how users interact with technology and algorithms is important for advancing this research. Building robots that can interact socially, in a robust way, with humans is a critical goal. Implementation processes and approaches that help generate value through robotic interfaces and related technology in organizations are of interest.
We are also interested in understanding behavioral and institutional factors affecting technology adoption and/or usage as well as the implementation processes and approaches that help generate value through technology in organizations. Additionally, we welcome papers that examine the usage and implications of robotic computing and its synergistic interactions with other technologies, such as artificial intelligence and machine learning.
We invite research that advances our understanding of human-computer and robot interactions and interfaces at various levels. We welcome both theoretical and empirical studies that apply all methodological approaches (e.g., experiments, analytical work, qualitative studies, design science, econometric analysis, and so forth). We particularly welcome controversial pieces that will challenge an audience’s thinking regarding taken-for-granted assumptions, models, and research practices.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Aesthetic and affective computing
  • Algorithm management for digital work platforms
  • Cognitive biases and heuristics in the context of novel digital technologies and digital nudging
  • Cognitive overload and technostress
  • Design and evaluation of end-user computing in work versus non-work environments, and in developing versus developed economies
  • Embedded IT applications including robotics, AI systems, intelligent homes, spatial systems
  • Feature-level IT adoption and use
  • HCI and robotics interface design issues with new devices and applications, such as smartphones, social networking sites, M-commerce, and pervasive computing
  • Human information-seeking behavior on the digital platforms
  • Human-robot interactions
  • Human-automated or autonomous vehicle interactions
  • Human interactions with autonomous and intelligent systems
  • Human-centeredness and user-centeredness in technology design, development, and use
  • Impact of interfaces on attitudes, behavior, performance, perception, learning, and productivity
  • Interfaces for information visualization and analytics and human-data interaction
  • NeuroIS studies on information systems design and use (i.e., neurocognition, neurophysiology, eye tracking)
  • Novel human-robot interaction theories, techniques, and methodologies
  • Personalization and adaptive interfaces
  • Psychological, social, and cultural aspects of human-computer and robot interactions
  • Studies on online persuasion and deception (e.g., fake news, fake reviews, manipulative e-commerce strategies)
  • Studies and frameworks that examine trust in, satisfaction with, and expectations of robotic partners
  • Usability engineering, metrics, and methods for user interface assessment
  • Usage and post-adoption behaviors, such as infusion, exploitation, and exploration of robot-like interfaces and technologies
  • Usability and design research for human collaboration with automated teammates

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Lingyun Qiu (Peking University)
  • Cheng Yi (Tsinghua University)
  • Mengxiang Li (Hong Kong Baptist University)

Associate Editors:

  • Abhijith Anand (University of Arkansas)
  • Cong Cao (Zhejiang University of Technology)
  • Xusen Cheng (Renmin University of China)
  • Xiling Cui (Hong Kong Shue Yan University)
  • Qiang He (Swinburne University of Technology)
  • Ye Hou (University of Greenwich)
  • Liqiang Huang (Zhejiang University)
  • Anushia Inthiran (University of Canterbury)
  • Yuhao Li (Shanghai International Studies University)
  • Lingli Wang (Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications)
  • David Jingjun Xu (City University of Hong Kong)
  • Jun Yan (University of Wollongong)
  • Xue Yang (Nanjing University)
  • Sangseok You (Sungkyunkwan University)

Track Description:

The penetration of digital technologies into our social and work lives has created important and fascinating research opportunities for exploring the interplay between users and digital technologies. The fast-evolving landscape of information technologies calls for an enhanced theorization of human-centric IS design, development, and use in different contexts. On the one hand, human beings are essential users of information systems and artifacts. A human-centric approach to design, development and use ensures that information systems and artifacts resonate more deeply with users, ultimately driving user adoption and engagement. On the other hand, information systems and artifacts are conceived, designed, and developed by human beings individually and collectively within various organizational and social structures.
This track invites research that enhances our theorization of human-centricity by focusing on humans as designers, developers, and users at the individual, group, organization, and societal levels as well as the intersection across levels. We welcome papers that employ a variety of theories, perspectives, and methodologies (e.g., qualitative, quantitative, conceptual, and design science, conducted in the field or the lab). Research that adopts an interdisciplinary approach examines less-explored areas, and focuses on emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, robotics, machine learning, blockchains, etc. is especially encouraged.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Novel theoretical perspectives and research approaches that broaden and deepen the concept of human-centricity in IS design, development, and use
  • Effects of automation digital technologies such as artificial intelligence and robotics on user engagement
  • Impacts of augmented, mixed, and virtual reality technologies on human behaviors and interactions and new technologies such as wearable devices and sensors
  • Influences of the factors associated with designers and developers on system design and development outcomes
  • Influences of social and organizational factors on human behaviors associated with information systems (e.g., organizational culture, social norms, and institutional forces)
  • Cross-cultural research of human behaviors associated with system design, development, and use
  • Theorization of users’ resistance to emerging digital technologies in various contexts (e.g., healthcare, education, etc.) and strategies to address the resistance
  • Gamification and its influence on human behaviors

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Xinwei Wang (University of Auckland)
  • Jonathan Hua Ye, (University of Oklahoma)
  • Xixian Peng (Zhejiang University)

Associate Editors:

  • Frank Chan (Essec)
  • Zilong Liu (Dongbei University of Finance and Economics)
  • Xuhong Ye (Zhejiang University of Technology)
  • Claire Bi (University of Canterbury)
  • Zhiyong Liu (Dalian University of Technology)
  • Sander Zwanenburg (University of Otago)
  • Maduka Subasinghage (Auckland University of Technology)
  • Yuxiang (Chris) Zhao (Nanjing University of Science and Technology)
  • Xinlin Yao (Nankai University)
  • Shijie Song (Hohai University)
  • Jiamin Yin (Renmin University of China)
  • Yao Shi (University of North Carolina, Wilmington)
  • Peng Liu (California State University, Fullterton)

Track Description:

Digital health is an area of robust growth. Health technology keeps on progressing at a noteworthy rate, and plays a critical role in the healthcare delivery system, including enhancing the quality of care, transparency of medical information, and efficiency of information flow. The promise of digital health solutions, such as AI and machine learning, is to deliver more cost-efficient and patient-centric healthcare through widespread sharing of authorized data, process transformation, and proactive involvement by patients to sustain their well-being.
While technological advancements bring great benefits to healthcare, they also pose many challenges including issues related to (1) massive healthcare data integration, (2) security, privacy, and the socio-technical aspects of patient safety, (3) explanations of the findings based on big data analysis, and (4) implementation of healthcare innovations. Innovations of health IT and IS for healthcare lead to improved outcomes with the use of administrative, clinical, and financial applications, which emphasize the infrastructure required to deliver applications and technologies leading to improved patient outcomes and quality. Importantly, the approach developed used a variety of methodologies and stimulus techniques to engage the public and specialists in informed discussion around this track.
The core aim of this track is to provide an opportunity for the people, including scholars, policy decision-makers, industry partners, stakeholders, and the general public, to meet, interact and exchange new ideas, and share practical innovations on health IT and IS for healthcare in the digital age. We welcome all research related to health IT and IS for healthcare and are open to all types of research methods (e.g., simulation, survey, experimentation, literature review, case studies, action research, etc.). Practice-based research is also appreciated. Both full research papers and research-in-progress papers are welcome.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Health informatics and biomedical informatics
  • Big data, applied AI, and machining learning in healthcare
  • User-generated content and its impact on healthcare practices and providers
  • Online citizen science in healthcare
  • Personalized and precision medicine
  • E-health, telehealth, mobile health, and their impacts
  • Wearable health devices and their health outcomes
  • Patient accessibility and health care simulation
  • Electronic data sharing and transfer using health information exchanges
  • Safety, security, and privacy of health information
  • Technology-enabled patient care (self-care) management
  • The impact of Healthcare and Information Systems on care providers, patients, and payers

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Kevin Kuan (The University of Sydney)
  • Libo Liu (University of Melbourne)
  • Yixin (Sarah) Zhang (University of Gothenburg)

Associate Editors:

  • Yuanyuan Dang (South China University of Technology)
  • Dongxiao Gu (Hefei University of Technology)
  • Xitong Guo (Harbin Institute of Technology)
  • Weixun Li (Deakin University)
  • Shan Liu (Xi’an Jiaotong University)
  • Xuan Liu (East China University of Science and Technology)
  • Fanbo Meng (Jiangnan University)
  • Kristijan Mirkovski (Deakin University)
  • Yichuan Wang (Sheffield University Management School)
  • Hong Wu (Huazhong University of Science and Technology)
  • Chunxiao Yin (Southwest University)
  • Nan (Andy) Zhang (Harbin Institute of Technology)
  • Xiaofei Zhang (Nankai University)
  • Xing Zhang (Wuhan Textile University)

Track Description:

The advancement of digital technologies provides great opportunities for the whole sector of IS education and e-learning, wherein education providers, practitioners, and researchers are constantly exploring and evaluating new ways to exploit technologies to improve learners’ experiences and outcomes, and to accommodate the demands of learners, changing social environment or learning contexts. The COVID-19 pandemic, for example, has led to e-learning becoming one of the most important components of all educational institutions around the world. Yet, the use of digital technologies as a new pedagogical tool in IS Education and e-Learning is not without its challenges.
In this track, we discuss both the innovative approaches that integrate emerging technologies to improve learners’ experiences and outcomes, as well as the threats and challenges currently faced by IS education and e-learning and the coping strategies used to deal with them. The focus of the track will be on new and innovative approaches to curriculum, course design, pedagogy, and practice. We particularly welcome submissions addressing the implementation of cutting-edge technologies (e.g., AI, VR/AR, Cloud computing, Big data analytics, etc.) in education, and exploring innovative IS educational practices during the COVID-19 pandemic, such as microlearning, gamification of learning, flipped classrooms, etc.
This track aims to provide a valuable and informative platform for various stakeholders to present and discuss IS education, pedagogy, and digital learning. We hope this track can bring new teaching approaches and methods to the IS field and provide new learning experiences for students in IS as well as other disciplines. We welcome high-quality research papers on any major topic of IS education, pedagogy, and digital learning. All research methods and approaches addressing the key issues in IS education, pedagogy, and digital learning are welcomed.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • IS curriculum design, innovation, and model curricula
  • Innovative pedagogical approaches and evaluation in IS education
  • COVID-19 and e-learning innovation
  • Dark sides of IT in IS education and digital learning
  • Edutainment, gamification of learning
  • Educational big data and learning analytics
  • Social attentive user interfaces for digital learning
  • Autodidactism or self-learning in IS education
  • Workplace and lifelong education for IS discipline
  • IT-enabled (e.g., Mobile technology, VR/AR, AI, blockchain, etc.) innovative learning environments (e.g., MOOC, blended learning, micro-learning, fragmented courses, smart and personalized education, collaborative Learning, etc.).

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Sharon Tan (National University of Singapore)
  • Weiling Ke (Southern University of Science and Technology)
  • Tingru Cui (University of Melbourne)

Associate Editors:

  • Yuanyue Feng (Shenzhen University)
  • Yani Shi (Southeast University)
  • Yuan Sun (Zhejiang Gongshang University)
  • Shaobo Wei (Hefei University of Technology)
  • Jinbi Yang (Wuxi University)
  • Evelyn Ng (Sydney University)
  • Oteng Ntsweng (National University of Singapore)
  • Holly Tootell (University of Wollongong)
  • Rohan Genrich (University of Southern Queensland)
  • Harshit Kumar Singh (IIM Rohtak)
  • Namza Naseer (RMIT University)
  • Soonja Yeom (University of Tasmania)
  • Anson C.H. Huang (National Taiwan University of Science and Technology)
  • Yiliao Song (RMIT University)
  • Rui Gu (University of International Business and Economics)

Track Description:

Organizations are conducting new technology projects (e.g., blockchain, fintech, SAAS, and smart technology) to transform and innovate their products/services. Such products/services create significant competitive advantages. In this track, we invite cutting-edge research that sheds novel theoretical perspectives, novel empirical insights, and other useful knowledge contributions on the ways of digital transformation and digital innovation. This track is open to all types of research, conceptual, theoretical, analytical, and/or empirical.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Digital transformation
  • Digital innovation
  • Service innovation
  • Digital eco-system
  • Managing digital projects
  • Digital innovation and project management
  • Managing data analytics projects
  • Managing organizational change associated with IS projects

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Chih-Hung PENG (National Taiwan University)
  • Qiqi JIANG (Copenhagen Business School)
  • Lele KANG (Nanjing University)

Associate Editors:

  • Aseem Pahuja (The University of Manchester)
  • Chin-Sheng Yang (Yuan Ze University)
  • José Parra-Moyano (Copenhagen Business School)
  • Ling-Chieh Kung (National Taiwan University)
  • Shaoxiong Fu (Nanjing Agricultural University)
  • Tailai Wu (Huazhong University of Science and Technology)
  • Ting Xu (Southern University of Science and Technology)
  • Wei Du (Renmin University)
  • Weifang Wu (Copenhagen Business School)
  • Wenping Zhang (Renmin University of China)
  • Ya-Ling Wu (Tamkang University)
  • Yi Ding (Warwick University)
  • Yi-Ling Lin (National Chengchi University)

Track Description:

Ubiquitous computing (or pervasive computing) is rapidly evolving from mobile computing because the Internet of Things (IoT) and related technologies provide the infrastructure of connected devices empowered with computing and communication capabilities. Technology innovations enabled by ubiquitous computing are transforming the daily lives of individual consumers (e.g., digital bracelets), the industrial production and delivery of products and services (e.g., sensors used to monitor the condition of manufacturing machines), and the operations of the public sector (e.g., smart city applications). McKinsey estimated that the potential economic value of IoT applications could be $5.5 trillion in 2021 and will reach $12.6 trillion in value globally by 2030. Global investment in IoT-based smart services is on the rise, with smart homes, smart wearables, and smart cities topping the list. There is thus a pressing need for practitioners to understand how to leverage, manage, and market the transformational impacts of such technologies.
This PACIS track on Mobile, IoT, and Ubiquitous Computing aims to provide a venue to assemble Information Systems research that addresses the behavioral, economic, managerial, and strategic issues emerging from ubiquitous and pervasive computing. We welcome a wide spectrum of research—1) from exploratory to explanatory and confirmatory studies, 2) at/across different levels—from individual users to organizations and cities, and 3) upon different theoretical foundations—e.g., Data Science, Design Science, Service Science, Operations Management, and Organization Science.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • User interaction with IoT objects
  • Streaming data analytics
  • Business processes innovation enabled by ubiquitous computing
  • The strategic management of organization changes supported by IoT
  • The migration from mobile computing to ubiquitous and pervasive computing
  • Smart city and smart home
  • Smart services and business intelligence
  • Human-centered pervasive computing
  • Context awareness and affective computing in mobile systems and fundamental research into smart devices
  • Machine learning, artificial intelligence, and blockchain applications in ubiquitous and pervasive computing

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Yu-Chen Yang (National Sun Yat-sen University)
  • Mihoko Sakurai (International University of Japan)
  • Hsin-Lu Chang (National Chengchi University)

Associate Editors:

  • Shengli Li (Peking University)
  • Yong Jin (Hong Kong Polytechnic University)
  • Chieh Lee (National Sun Yat-sen University)
  • Ranjan Vaidya (Auckland University of Technology)
  • Ruilin Zhu (Lancaster University)
  • Chih-Yuan Chou (National Chengchi University)
  • Yu-Ju Tu (National Chengchi University)

Track Description:

Philosophy is a reflection that deliberately and rigorously examines what has been accepted as given. From a philosophical standpoint, an information systems scholar is expected to periodically pause his/her research endeavors to question, for instance, what constitutes “information”, what constitutes “systems”, and what constitutes “research”, and then to open oneself up to whatever revelations one derives from the questioning when resuming research on information systems. In this sense, philosophy requires the information systems community to eventually research itself by re-examining its own historical and intellectual roots, where the community’s ineptitude in doing this would foreshadow its ineffectiveness in researching information systems.
Philosophy also sets the stage for the systematic procedures – research methods – that we adopt to build and test theory when conducting research. Methods can be revealed as inadequate and even incorrect when illuminated under the light of philosophy. Consequently, methodological research – research on methods – best entails a philosophical perspective. Indeed, advances in technology offer unprecedented opportunities for information systems scholars to revisit and refine conventional research models to deliver fresh insights with a significant contribution.
The Philosophy and Research Methods Track prefers submissions that regard philosophy and research methods in the ways just delimited. Purely empirical studies, which are not motivated by philosophical and/or methodological reflection, are not appropriate for this track. However, empirical material is always welcome for exemplifying a study’s broader philosophical and methodological considerations.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Have the philosophical foundations and methodological practices of information systems research evolved over time?
  • How do philosophical foundations inform methodological practices within information systems research?
  • What is the maturity of information systems research as a reference discipline for theories and methods?
  • How can we define evaluative criteria for determining the contribution of information systems research?
  • How can we strike a balance between rigor and relevance in information systems research?
  • Is there room for phenomenon-driven research within the information systems discipline?
  • What is the nature and role of theories in information systems research?
  • How should we go about developing native information systems theories?
  • What does it mean to theorize within information systems research and how can we improve the process of theorizing?
  • What are the philosophical and methodological impacts of emerging paradigms in information systems research (e.g., critical realism, design science, engaged scholarship, and pluralism)?
  • What are predominant methodological trends in information systems research and how do these trends influence theory development?

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Eric T.K. Lim (UNSW Sydney)
  • Zhao Cai (University of Nottingham Ningbo China)
  • Na Jiang (Beijing Normal University-Hong Kong Baptist University United International College)

Associate Editors:

  • Sandeep Mysore Seshadrinath (UNSW Sydney)
  • Michael Cahalane (UNSW Sydney)
  • Tingting Song (Shanghai Jiao Tong University)
  • Yue Cheng (Nanchang University)
  • Yunfei Shi (UNSW Sydney)
  • Shuning Zheng (University of Nottingham Ningbo China)
  • Hui Yuan (Shanghai International Studies University)
  • Haiping Zhao (China University of Petroleum – East China)
  • Dan Ma (Southwestern University of Finance and Economics)
  • Yuting Wang (Shanghai University)
  • Jie Fang (University of Nottingham Ningbo China)
  • Yan Li (Central University of Finance and Economics)
  • Blair Wang (University of Sydney)
  • Malshika Dias (RMIT University)
  • Christine Van Toorn (UNSW Sydney)
  • Jiawei Chen (Shanghai University of Finance and Economics)

Track Description:

The Service Science and IS track aims to contribute to Service Science and Information Systems (IS) research. Service Science is an interdisciplinary field that aims to analyze service systems, and their configurations of value co-creating actors, aiming to advance knowledge about the role of service and service innovation in society more broadly. Indeed, there is a strong precedent of Service Science research in the IS discipline, and extant contributions helped make service systems smarter, more resource-efficient, and more customer-oriented.
We call for relevant and rigorous research that reaches beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries. The interdisciplinary nature of Service Science supports the diversity of research paradigms, including theoretical, empirical, and design science.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Service design
  • Service Innovation
  • Service science
  • Customer service experiences
  • Service-dominant logic
  • Emerging technologies and services
  • Servitization
  • IS service strategies
  • Service ecosystems
  • Smart service

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Christoph F. Breidbach (The University of Queensland)
  • Lincoln Wood (University of Otago)
  • Nila Windasari (Institut Teknologi Bandung)

Associate Editors:

  • Jens Poeppelbuss (Ruhr University Bochum)
  • Christian Bartelheimer (Paderborn University)
  • Luthfi Ramadani (Telkom University)
  • Shahper Richter (Auckland University of Technology)
  • Yi Chin Lin (Hofstra University)
  • Jian-Hang Wang (National Taichung University of Education)
  • Mousa Ahmad Al-Bashrawi (King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals)
  • Kellan Nguyen (Middlesex University London)

Track Description:

Advanced technologies such as automated, artificial intelligence (AI), and other data-centric technologies offer novel opportunities and pose significant challenges to society at the scale and scope that set them apart from the previous generations of digital technologies. On the one hand, these digital technologies hold unprecedented promise in advancing economic, social, and environmental sustainability and addressing existing problems such as inequality, injustice, human rights violation, climate change, and environmental damages, among others. However, much of the current understanding and debates focus on the potential of digital technologies and their ideal and frictionless use scenarios. As a result, much less is known about their impacts on society and sustainability. For instance, preliminary studies suggest that technologies such as AI will reshape work and transform a workplace in complex and unexpected ways. These transformations are likely to produce a profound change to work configurations with a radical shift in human skills and greater risks and harm, particularly for those who do not have control of the design and use of these emerging technologies.
This track aims to provide a platform for researchers to showcase research on the role of digital technologies in sustainability and their societal impacts across different contexts. In addition to generating novel insights, studies should carefully articulate their implications to relevant stakeholders, emphasizing how we might improve future development, assessment, and regulation of emerging digital technologies. Contributions that take a critical approach to understanding the impacts of digital technologies and the unintended consequences of their use are particularly welcomed.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Individual and societal consequences of current or emerging digital technologies or technological trends
  • Unintended consequences of current or emerging digital technologies
  • Roles of digital technologies in addressing social inequalities and promoting inclusive practices
  • Barriers to sustainability in marginalized communities
  • Roles of digital technologies in transition pathways to social, economic, and environmental sustainability
  • Roles of digital technologies in addressing societal and environmental sustainability problems
  • Creative socio-technical innovations with societal and/or environmental sustainability impacts
  • Governance of current and emerging digital technologies
  • Resilience and sustainability issues in a digital world
  • The politics of digital technologies

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Angsana A. Techatassanasoontorn (Auckland University of Technology)
  • Hameed Chughtai (Lancaster University)

Associate Editors:

  • Leona Chandra Kruse (University of Lichtenstein)
  • Claris Chung (University of Canterbury)
  • Riitta Hekkala (Aalto University)
  • Andrea Jimenez (University of Sheffield)
  • Stan Karanasios (University of Queensland)
  • Silvia Masiero (University of Oslo)
  • Cat Morgan (Heriot-Watt University)
  • Rohit Nishant (Université Laval)
  • Tamara Roth (University of Luxembourg)
  • Uzair Shah (Lancaster University)
  • Pitso Tsibolane (University of Cape Town)
  • Sharon Wagg (University of Sheffield)

Track Description:

Emerging IS trends have ushered in an era of digitalization, accelerating the proliferation of digital innovations at all levels (i.e., individuals, organizations, and societies) and extending the frontier of research for the IS discipline. For instance, at the consumer level, virtual, augmented, extended, and mixed reality technologies have augmented the customer journey by enhancing consumers’ immersive experience and perceived reality of service encounters. Likewise, for businesses, artificial intelligence and machine learning have been deployed to not only better comprehend consumers’ needs, predict consumption behaviors, and deliver tailored services matching consumer preferences (e.g., by identifying consumers through their appearances or voices to personalize interactions and provide customized recommendations) but also aid in optimizing business operations and solving complex managerial problems. On the societal level, evolving IS trends in the likes of global connectedness, on-demand workplaces, remote work, robotics, and smart cities have yielded massive socio-economic benefits. At the same time, the fusion of digital innovations into every aspect of our lives has given rise to unprecedented challenges in the form of the digital divide, climate change, deep fakes, as well as algorithmic biases and responsibility, to name a few.
To prepare for an increasingly digitalized future, the track welcomes pioneering research that pushes the boundaries of IS research and practices. We encourage submissions to the track to (1) contest existing paradigms in the field of IS that may no longer be applicable in light of recent technological trends, (2) advance novel methodologies for generating fresh insights into trends that would not have been possible otherwise, and (3) open up new avenues for research that addresses elusive issues to be resolved in anticipation of a digitalized future. The track embraces research that is deliberately provocative and touches on the broader individual, managerial, and/or societal issues arising from the way technologies are likely to progress in the future.
Any type of submission, including agenda-setting reviews, empirical studies, opinion pieces, or theory development papers, is welcome. Given that emerging technological trends tend to permeate disciplinary and methodological boundaries, we encourage interdisciplinary and/or methodologically pluralistic work that offers a novel view of emerging IS phenomena.

Potential Topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Contemporary challenges and/or opportunities associated with developmental trends in
  • Artificial intelligence and machine learning
  • Brain-computer interaction
  • Cryptocurrency and cloud computing
  • Digital twin
  • Edge computing
  • FinTech and RegTech
  • Green computing
  • Holographic 3D printing
  • Immersive media (e.g., augmented reality, virtual reality, mixed reality, extended reality)
  • Jitterbug, assistive technology, and gerontechnology
  • Kill chain management
  • Low code technology and development platforms
  • Metaverse and non-fungible tokens (NFTs)
  • Neuro-IS
  • Open-source intelligence
  • Pervasive computing
  • Quantum computing applications
  • Robotic process automation with human-in-the-loop
  • Smart devices, homes, offices, cities, and nations
  • Total or multi-experience
  • Universal authentication
  • Voice and speech recognition for conversational chatbots
  • Wearable and haptic technology

Track Co-Chairs:

  • Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah (City University of Hong Kong)
  • Khim Yong Goh (National University of Singapore)
  • Chee-Wee Tan (Copenhagen Business School)

Associate Editors:

  • Langtao CHEN (Missouri University of Science and Technology)
  • Yoon HAN (Harbin Institute of Technology)
  • Fangfang HOU (Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University)
  • Chen JIN (National University of Singapore)
  • Arpan Kumar KAR (Indian Institute of Technology Delhi)
  • Alvin Chung Man LEUNG (City University of Hong Kong)
  • Boying LI (University of Nottingham Ningbo China)
  • Ding LI (Nanjing University)
  • Yong LIU (Aalto University)
  • Felix TAN (University of New South Wales)
  • Ofir TUREL (University of Melbourne)
  • Bingqing XIONG (Deakin University)
  • Mengli YU (Nankai University)
  • Ying ZHANG (University of Auckland)